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EchoElite

Phase change cooling

20 posts in this topic

Phase-change cooling is an extremely effective way to cool the processor. A vapor compression phase-change cooler is a unit which usually sits underneath the PC, with a tube leading to the processor. Inside the unit is a compressor, the same type that cools a freezer. The compressor compresses a gas (or mixture of gases) which condenses it into a liquid. Then, the liquid is pumped up to the processor, where it passes through an expansion device, this can be from a simple capillary tube to a more elaborate thermal expansion valve. The liquid evaporates (changing phase), absorbing the heat from the processor as it draws extra energy from its environment to accommodate this change (see latent heat). The evaporation can produce temperatures reaching around −15 to -150 degrees Celsius. The gas flows down to the compressor and the cycle begins over again. This way, the processor can be cooled to temperatures ranging from −15 to −150 degrees Celsius, depending on the load, wattage of the processor, the refrigeration system (see refrigeration) and the gas mixture used. This type of system suffers from a number of issues but mainly one must be concerned with dew point and the proper insulation of all sub-ambient surfaces that must be done (the pipes will sweat, dripping water on sensitive electronics).

Alternately a new breed of cooling system is being developed inserting a pump into the thermo siphon loop. This adds another degree of flexibility for the design engineer as the heat can now be effectively transported away from the heat source and either reclaimed or dissipated to ambient. Junction temperature can be tuned by adjusting the system pressure; higher pressure equals higher fluid saturation temperatures. This allows for smaller condensers, smaller fans and/or the effective dissipation of heat in a high ambient environment. These systems are in essence the next generation liquid cooling paradigm as they are approximately 10 times more efficient than single phase water. Since the system uses a dielectric as the heat transport media, leaks do not cause a catastrophic failure of the electric system.

This type of cooling is seen as a more extreme way to cool components, since the units are relatively expensive compared to the average desktop. They also generate a significant amount of noise, since they are essentially refrigerators, however the compressor choice and air cooling system is the main determinant of this, allowing for flexibility for noise reduction based on the parts chosen.

What do you think? im planning on overclocking my computer, so i think ill take the plunge and buy a unit

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I've seen something similar if not what you're talking about a few years ago. It was basically a refrigeration unit that the tower sat on. I didn't see or hear too much more about them after that. There most likely was a lot of bugs to be worked out, and I remember them costing over a thousand dollars.

I don't know how good they will sell as I can only see this being used by a small niche market.

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Well, its 700$ for the unit i want, but i can afford that, and it is usable as long as you insulate the processor socket

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its just that once you submerge your computer in that, you cant take out the parts, or at least thats what ive heard

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I just looked through that site and I don't understand something. Whats the point in submerging the motherboard when they're cooling all the normally cooled components in a typical water cooled setup to begin with.

As in all they're doing is cooling the computer in a typical water cooled fashion and then dunking all that in fluid for what reason I don't know. Maybe i'm missing something...

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I just looked through that site and I don't understand something. Whats the point in submerging the motherboard when they're cooling all the normally cooled components in a typical water cooled setup to begin with.

As in all they're doing is cooling the computer in a typical water cooled fashion and then dunking all that in fluid for what reason I don't know. Maybe i'm missing something...

Well, with a water cooling system, it can only cool so much, whereas oil is pretty much thermo-absent when over-clocking. Plus it cools 100% of the mobo's/CPU/GPU/etc. parts and not just it's processors.

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What i'm saying they're doing seems redundant. Usually you either water cool a computer or you submerge it in oil/fluid. They're doing both. First they're putting a water cooling system on their motherboards but instead of water they're using some kind of fluid. Then after that they're taking their fluid/water cooled motherboards and submerging them in the fluid.

But if they're trying to get ten grand for a computer they've had to of done their homework...

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Idk, I think its a good stat computer, only b/c of it's maximal overclocking abilities, even on todays i7

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Heres something that i might get

(Click Here)

I had that on my XP pc. It worked beautifly, I got mine from xoxide.com

But it's a sucha hassle. Are you buying it with sleeves or are you going to put them on your self?

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im buying it with sleeves

I sleeved mine with UV green. Like I said, it works fine but the product....it's old as fuck. Seems like it's been out for almost 6 or 7 years now. It's not meant for todays overclocked Intel i7.

I'm using this now on my new 09' computer:

38.JPG

And on my XP computer:

inst4.jpg

~btw, I just googled those pics.

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Nice, but still like that other cooler that i first looked at, so im going to use that one

FreezoneElite.sized.jpg

Since, im going with amd, and i wont be overclocking

Amd phenom X4

AMD-Phenom-9600-CP1-AM2-2.jpg

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Lmao, dude the cooling system your wanting is specifically MADE FOR an extremely overclocked CPU. There is such thing at cooling too much, if you can believe that.

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Well, i wont overclock TILL i figure out my system, and get it working stable, then i will overclock.

One quick question, should i go with artic silver five, or artic silver ceramique

as in, which one works better

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ok ok, lol i didn't know you didn't know your system yet.

And for your question: I really don't know, I used Arctic Silver Five on both my PC's and it's worked great so far. I really don't see a difference in the two you posted but yea...

It seems like the Silver Ceramique used on old CPU's, as in 1995+. If you still question it, your best bet is just googling it, or better, youtube it and see the difference that meets your standards.

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