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EON8

Numbers Stations

16 posts in this topic

I was searching for videos that referenced Eon8 on Youtube when I came across three videos that were loosely linked to Eon8. A couple people in the coments said the audio portion was from "Numbers Stations." I was curious what that was so I googled it. What I found was very interesting. Theres a whole underground world of shortwave radio usage in which international drug traffickers, spies, and other things of that nature use to communicate secret coded messages.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Numbers_station

Examples: http://home.freeuk.com/spook007/

No government or private agency has ever acknowledged their existence.

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Sounds like a party. I think we should find some folks here on Eon8 that are into shortwave and start our own numbers station. Haha. I'd totally go find a shortwave radio receiver/transmitter if we did that. One-time pads, times, dates, frequencies distributed via personal messages, just for fun. See if we start getting anyone monitoring OUR station, thinkin' we're some sort of secretive group. Then all we'd have to do is figure out what to broadcast before and after the messages that would be unique and awesome.

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I was thinking the same exact thing. :laugh:

It would be a lot of work though. I think they can figure out what general direction the signals originating from. After a while they might realize its just people fooling around. I would have to imagine as well that its been done in the past.

...Echo...Oscar...November...Eight...

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Eh, this may be true. Just look up any basic WWII military stuff and you'll find direction-finding stations used to try and intercept and triangulate signals. I'd still do it just for the fun of it. Kinda make it a globalhalo sorta thing. Keep using coded messages, even if the codes get cracked, make the messages so vague and unusual as to defy conventional explanation, as far as the public is concerned. People love that stuff. They'll eat it right up.

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I was thinking more about this and I wonder how legal it would be? Not that it would sway me one way or another, it was just something I thought about.

Also i'm sure you have to have some pretty powerful equipment to transmit any kind of distance. But then again I don't know too much about any of this or know of anybody that does. :indifferent:

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Thanks to Wikipedia! Yea yea yea... Wiki can be edited by the general public, whine whine whine. But This is some basic knowledge at least. Legality issues: need a license to operate a transmitter, but receivers are completely and totally legal.

Amateur radio

In the U.S. and Canada, no license is required to own or operate a shortwave receiver. The privilege of operating a shortwave radio transmitter for non-commercial two way communications known as amateur radio is granted through a licensing process by authorized government agencies.

In the USA, the licensing agency is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). In Canada, the licensing agency is Industry Canada. As of February 2007, the FCC eliminated the Morse code requirement for all Amateur Radio operator classes, thereby allowing more operators to transmit in the HF bands.

Amateur radio operators have made many technical advancements in the field of radio and make themselves available to transmit emergency communications when normal communications channels fail. Some amateurs practice operating off the power grid so as to be prepared for power loss. It should be noted that many amateur radio operators started out as Shortwave Listeners (SWLs) and actively encourage SWLs to become amateur radio operators.

The 2003 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC) removed the global requirement for Morse code proficiency needed to access most shortwave frequencies for the amateur radio service, but left the decision to each administrative body (e.g. Federal Communications Commission in the United States; Industry Canada in Canada). Many countries have phased out this requirement from their licenses and give access to the shortwave frequencies to all licencees. A few countries however have decided to keep the Morse Code requirement for the foreseeable future. In July 2005, the Federal Communications Commission recommended the removal of the Morse code requirement for amateur radio licenses the United States, as part of a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in WT Docket 05-235.[11] This docket was released after 18 proposals, including one from the ARRL for widespread changes in the Amateur Radio Service rules were received and considered by the FCC. These proposals had attracted 6200 comments from the Amateur Radio Service community. The FCC released a Report and Order on December 19, 2006, eliminating the Morse code requirement for amateur radio licensing in the United States.

A pennant sent to overseas listeners by Radio Budapest in the late 1980s

[edit] Shortwave listening

Further information: Shortwave listening

Many hobbyists listen to shortwave broadcasters without operating transmitters. In some cases, the goal is to hear as many stations from as many countries as possible (DXing); others listen to specialized shortwave utility, or "ute", transmissions such as maritime, naval, aviation, or military signals. Others focus on intelligence signals from numbers stations, or the two way communications by amateur radio operators.

Many listeners tune the shortwave bands for the programmes of stations broadcasting to a general audience (such as Voice of Russia, China Radio International, Radio Canada International, Voice of America, BBC World Service, Radio Australia, Radio Netherlands, Voice of Korea, etc.). Today, through the evolution of the Internet, the hobbyist can listen to shortwave signals via remotely controlled shortwave receivers around the world, even without owning a shortwave radio. Many international broadcasters (such as Radio Canada International [5], the BBC and Radio Australia) offer live streaming audio on their websites. Shortwave listeners, or SWLs, can obtain QSL cards from broadcasters, utility stations or amateur radio operators as trophies of the hobby. Some stations even give out special certificates, pennants, stickers and other tokens and promotional materials to shortwave listeners.

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Lots of good information there. I know you need a HAM operators license but I was questioning the legality of falsely impersonating a numbers station. Like any other hobby it can become very expensive. The best bet would be if we ever got a member who was into it or knew somebody who would transmit what we wanted.

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Actually, Disturbedguy, that link is for INTERNATIONAL radio. Not for a local broadcast. I'm sure it would be much cheaper for something that's shorter range.

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Its still expensive if you want to have any kind of power. During my childhood the next door neighbor was big into it. He had a 30+ft antenna tower among other antennas all over the house. He spent tens of thousands of dollars. What was annoying though was when he was keyed up it would badly interfere with the phones.

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Actually, Disturbedguy, that link is for INTERNATIONAL radio. Not for a local broadcast. I'm sure it would be much cheaper for something that's shorter range.

Oops... didn't notice that. Like Eon said, however: still quite a bit of money. I'm sure it's also still more expensive than any of us wish to shell out just to have our own private shortwave station =P

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Even if I was rich and had the money just lying around for this, I would do something like put up an Eon8 billboard instead. :tongue:

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Haha, Just got to this topic. It sounds like a fun idea to me. Start throwing out random encrypted messages that mean virtually nothing but make the public unusually wary of what's going on. Sometimes "accidentally" tap into a random persons personal station and broadcast a message in plain text, like "cousin rodney has "taken" care of bill shaster, rendezvous on pier 44 at exactly 1600, Shonda will be waiting with the package"

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Start throwing out random encrypted messages that mean virtually nothing but make the public unusually wary of what's going on.

Thats exactly what Eon8 had. But instead of messages they were numbers. happy0035.gif

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